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re: "Charlie Girl" and "Salad Days" - both long West End runs - why not Broadway?
Posted by: tmdonahue 08:30 am EDT 07/10/21
In reply to: "Charlie Girl" and "Salad Days" - both long West End runs - why not Broadway? - PlayWiz 07:47 am EDT 07/10/21

Historically, not all West End hits prosper on Broadway and vice versa. "Buddy" was a huge hit in London; zip in New York. Despite good reviews "Matilda" did not thrive on Broadway as it had on the West End. An article in the The Telegraph lists some shows that did well on Broadway but not the West End: "City of Angels," "The Drowsy Chaperone," "Pippin," "Movin' Out," "Spring Awakening," and "Thoroughly Modern Millie."

"Salad Days" played at the Barbizon-Plaza in 1958 and Brooks Atkinson hated it. (Same show?) Today, the theater spaces at the Barbizon-Plaza, mostly a 1400 room hotel, would be considered off-Broadway. The building is now the Trump Parc.

The London revival of "Charlie Girl" with Cyd Charisse (whose legs were insured for $1 million by the producer!) ran only 6 months. A synopsis from Wikipedia:

"Lady Hadwell, the widow of an aristocrat, is struggling to make ends meet by opening her home to the public. The youngest of her three daughters, Charlotte, known as "Charlie", is a tomboy. Their loyal assistant, Joe, is in love with Charlie. When he learns he has won a fortune on the football pools, he conceals the fact from his employers. In the meantime, her mother is hoping for an engagement between Charlie and an American millionaire. The most memorable and comic moment of the show is when in a Cinderella style takeoff, Charlie has to return her hired evening gown, and the rest of the guests at the ball also decide to cavort in their underwear."

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