P.S. Why is there an Andrews Sisters parody in 'Company'?
Last Edit: WaymanWong 11:58 pm EDT 06/08/24
Posted by: WaymanWong 11:53 pm EDT 06/08/24
In reply to: re: TB REGIONAL REVIEW: "COMPANY" in SAN FRANCISCO - Chromolume 10:40 pm EDT 06/08/24

Since we're discussing Marianne Elliott's Tony-winning, gender-swapping revival of ''Company'' ...

I really enjoy ''You Can Drive a Person Crazy.'' It's bright and bouncy, and Sondheim's lyrics are ever so clever. But here's something I've always wondered about: Even in 1970, when ''Company'' first opened on Broadway, why would three contemporary, young New York women - Kathy, April and Marta - be doing an Andrews Sisters parody? The Andrew Sisters are associated with the World War II era. Why would Kathy, April and Marta's musical tastes be linked to the 1940s? ''Company'' is not like ''Follies,'' where Sondheim did pastiches of Irving Berlin, George Gershwin, etc., to evoke the tunes of the ''Ziegfeld Follies.'' And now in the current ''Company'' revival, over 50 years later, you have three of Bobbie's beaus - Andy, Theo and PJ - doing ''You Could Drive a Person Crazy.'' Why three modern (straight) guys are doing a kinda campy Andrews Sisters parody is even more puzzling.

I've read Sondheim's collection of lyrics, ''Finishing the Hat,'' but Sondheim doesn't offer any insight into this. Am I missing something obvious?
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Next: re: P.S. Why is there an Andrews Sisters parody in 'Company'? - JereNYC 03:26 pm EDT 06/10/24
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